Peace Breaks Out by Angela Thirkell – Peace is to be declared, but is everyone happy?

Peace Breaks Out

Over the last couple of days I have been reposting my reviews of some of Angela Thirkell’s wartime novels that have just been republished in paperback by Virago Modern Classics. The covers are lovely, but more importantly it has meant that these particularly good novels are more easily available to those who are just discovering the Barsetshire series.

This is one of Thirkell’s  wartime novels in a way, though based more on the events of V.E. Day and “Vee – Jay” Day. It does reflect why some do not get on with her books, as the war is a background issue and those who lose loved ones rare in her books. There is a character in one book whose husband is posted as missing, and it is a moving picture of a woman whose life is in some senses on hold until she gets confirmation of her husband’s fate.  One of the characters who is not always the most popular (Mr Adams) tries so hard to find news. Which novel is it? I feel it might be one that is due to come out in the near future…

But I digress. This novel is surprisingly bitter about Peace being declared, seeing the announcement as an inconvenience rather  than marking the end of a terrifying time. Maybe it’s because this book is set in the countryside where air raids are rare (see Northbridge Rectory   for  home front descriptions), or maybe the day to day concerns of bread supply are the realistic way most people actually made it through. There are some disturbing references to refugees from European countries, but maybe I’m a little sensitive to such things at this time. Having just finished a Mitford novel ( I read them over breakfast – don’t judge) I found myself gritting my teeth far more over her subject matter. Is it a matter of hindsight or a genuine problem with writing of the past?

This 1946 novel is dominated by romance. David is at his outrageous flirting again, which almost proved disastrous in Wild Strawberries  , and it is more than time that someone stronger takes him on, which looks increasingly possible. In the meantime both Anne (Miss Buntings second heroine) and Martin are both made miserable by his antics. This book features many reoccurring characters, so may not be the best place to start with Thirkell (High Rising or Wild Strawberries  being better) . This novel will not disappoint Thirkell fans, if only because it features Lady Emily and her “portable property” barriers, her formidable if selective memory, and her appreciation of “that lovely creature”, Robin’s mother. This book ends so well for those with a sentimental nature, but could put others off who like their fiction a little more realistic and sensible….

 

Growing Up by Angela Thirkell – A new paperback edition published!

Growing Up (Virago Modern Classics): Amazon.co.uk: Thirkell, Angela: 9780349013435: Books

This is a reposting of my review of this excellent book to mark its republishing by VMC – if you have not read any of the Barsetshire novels, this is an excellent on, one of Thirkell’s wartime books from 1943.

 

This one of the wartime Thirkell novels that work so well. It reflects a time when the Second World War had been going on some time, written when the outcome of the fighting was still not apparent, when there was no indication of exactly how much longer it would go on. The fear of whether one of the characters had survived the evacuation of Dunkirk was in the past, but the drama of D Day and similar decisive action was still very much in the future. Men, brothers, husbands are still liable to be sent abroad; there is the real fear of them not returning. There is a certain settled acceptance of war time arrangements such as an entire hospital being billeted in the local big house, wounded soldiers being invalided out of the army, women taking on roles that would never have been envisaged pre war. This is the civilian side of war, but not one of bombings and blitz, but still there is some grief and fear.

Sir Harry and Lady Waring are living in part of their large house, the rest having been converted to a hospital for wounded soldiers. They lost their only son in the First World War, but are more than accepting that their nephew Cecil will inherit the house, provided that he survives his naval service. His sister, Leslie arrives on the scene having been involved at a high level in war work, but having suffered when her ship back from foreign work was torpedoed. At the beginning of the novel Lydia and Noel Merton are sent as paying guests to live with the Warings. Both have appeared in the Barsetshire novels before; Lydia was the memorable Lydia Keith, outrageous and noisy as a girl, now utterly devoted to her husband Noel and a settled character. She has become someone able to deal with many people and situations in a mature way, but still she has doubts. The servants in this novel are real characters, far from being dismissed as being unimportant. The scary Nannie Allen, overprotective of those she cares for, her daughter Selina, the focus of many male hopes while she cries at any situation, and Jasper the gamekeeper all contribute to the novel. Meanwhile the soldiers and nurses in the other part of the house contribute greatly to the story. There are a few set pieces which are particularly funny, including Mrs Spender who otherwise features in the Northbridge Rectory novel and Mrs Laura Morland, who gives a talk at the hospital. The latter sounds very much like a real experience on Thirkell’s part.

This is a very satisfactory episode in the Barsetshire series. There is no denying the fear and tension in the background; Thirkell in common with everyone else had no way of knowing what the outcome of the war would be; while the immediate fear of invasion had receded by this point, there was no foreseeable end and many people were still being sent secretly abroad. This novel does not contain the subtext of suspicion of refugees that some of the other books feature, each character has respect and understanding. I have really enjoyed rereading this book, and anyone who likes Thirkell’s novels will appreciate it.

 

Cheerfulness Breaks In by Angela Thirkell – a new Paperback edition appears

Cheerfulness Breaks In

In honour of the release of the new paperback edition by earlier this month from Virago Modern Classics – I am reposting my review. If it is a new book to you, this wartime book is a wonderful read and thoroughly recommended!

 

This is a wartime book, first published in 1940, which deals with the first months of the Second World War from the depths of the English countryside.  It is the story of various groups of families and friends of the mythical “Barsetshire”, comprising a  city with a cathedral, villages and country houses. Fans of Angela Thirkell will know that the series began in 1933 and carried on until 1961, with at least one book being published nearly every year. They featured the same group of families and some individuals, with the focus being on a smaller group in each book. Like a modern soap opera many stories ran in parallel, and took due note of the war by exploring departures and arrivals in the area by individuals as they served in the military forces and did other war work. This book deals with the evacuees who arrived in the area and depicts some of the token refugees from a fictional European state. It includes men who are about to be sent to serve elsewhere, and those who will miss them. It begins with a wedding and ends with engagements, but many of those involved are having to get used to other shortages and challenges.

 

One of the characters who features in this book is the lovely but distracted Rose Birkett, elder daughter of the Headmaster of Southbridge and his wife, Mr and Mrs Birkett. They and several men had been driven to despair by Rose’s distressing tendency to get engaged and break the relationship off all within a very short time, as recorded in previous novels and sort of fondly remembered by many. This book opens with her wedding to the extremely sensible Lieutenant John Fairweather, RN, who firmly deals with Rose’s ideas and takes her off to his posting in a South American city. In order to make sure that the wedding actually takes place the twenty one year old Lydia Keith is a firm and effective bridesmaid, and is much discussed throughout this novel. She would like to be nursing or joining another of the women’s services, but her mother’s illness and the need to run the small family estate means that she must be busy at home, with only occasional forays to help with the Communal Kitchen for Evacuee children. She attracts the attention of Noel Merton, but he realises that her age and responsibilities militate against him and his hopes. 

 

There are several set pieces which bring many of the characters together to meet and discuss matters of the day. A wedding, a sherry party, a dinner party are the civilised gatherings with social expectations which enable revelations. Less well controlled is the Christmas party held for the evacuated school children of the area, with religious and social divisions. Various characters reappear throughout the novel with great effect, including Mrs Morland, author and helper to at least one family. An entire school, Hosiers’ Boys Foundation School, are also brought into the area from London, and the staff have some issues settling in.

 

Like other of Thirkell’s other novels, there are social divisions here; servants and workers can be dismissed as being different and can be ordered about by their employers and others. The refugees are seen as aggressively different and challenging, dirty and unprincipled. However, there is a lot of acceptance among the gentry and others of relationships and friendships which are perhaps not the norm, and eccentricities of manner and behaviour. Noel observes that many people at this time are wishing they could be doing something else, somewhere else. There was a feeling that they were not sufficiently contributing to the war effort, despite their necessary work in producing crops or permitting others to run committees. At the heart of the book, however, beyond the comedy and fascinating dialogue, is the fear of what is to come, the separation and worse. After all, when Thirkell was writing this novel neither she or anyone else knew what was to come, or how long it would last. A most enjoyable novel, amid the best of Thirkell’s Barsetshire series, and a largely fascinating picture of a society.

Cheerfulness Breaks In by Angela Thirkell – an early wartime novel of Barsetshire

Cheerfulness Breaks In by Angela Thirkell | Hachette UK

 

This is a wartime book, first published in 1940, which deals with the first months of the Second World War from the depths of the English countryside.  It is the story of various groups of families and friends of the mythical “Barsetshire”, comprising a  city with a cathedral, villages and country houses. Fans of Angela Thirkell will know that the series began in 1933 and carried on until 1961, with at least one book being published nearly every year. They featured the same group of families and some individuals, with the focus being on a smaller group in each book. Like a modern soap opera many stories ran in parallel, and took due note of the war by exploring departures and arrivals in the area by individuals as they served in the military forces and did other war work. This book deals with the evacuees who arrived in the area and depicts some of the token refugees from a fictional European state. It includes men who are about to be sent to serve elsewhere, and those who will miss them. It begins with a wedding and ends with engagements, but many of those involved are having to get used to other shortages and challenges.

 

One of the characters who features in this book is the lovely but distracted Rose Birkett, elder daughter of the Headmaster of Southbridge and his wife, Mr and Mrs Birkett. They and several men had been driven to despair by Rose’s distressing tendency to get engaged and break the relationship off all within a very short time, as recorded in previous novels and sort of fondly remembered by many. This book opens with her wedding to the extremely sensible Lieutenant John Fairweather, RN, who firmly deals with Rose’s ideas and takes her off to his posting in a South American city. In order to make sure that the wedding actually takes place the twenty one year old Lydia Keith is a firm and effective bridesmaid, and is much discussed throughout this novel. She would like to be nursing or joining another of the women’s services, but her mother’s illness and the need to run the small family estate means that she must be busy at home, with only occasional forays to help with the Communal Kitchen for Evacuee children. She attracts the attention of Noel Merton, but he realises that her age and responsibilities militate against him and his hopes. 

 

There are several set pieces which bring many of the characters together to meet and discuss matters of the day. A wedding, a sherry party, a dinner party are the civilised gatherings with social expectations which enable revelations. Less well controlled is the Christmas party held for the evacuated school children of the area, with religious and social divisions. Various characters reappear throughout the novel with great effect, including Mrs Morland, author and helper to at least one family. An entire school, Hosiers’ Boys Foundation School, are also brought into the area from London, and the staff have some issues settling in.

 

Like other of Thirkell’s other novels, there are social divisions here; servants and workers can be dismissed as being different and can be ordered about by their employers and others. The refugees are seen as aggressively different and challenging, dirty and unprincipled. However, there is a lot of acceptance among the gentry and others of relationships and friendships which are perhaps not the norm, and eccentricities of manner and behaviour. Noel observes that many people at this time are wishing they could be doing something else, somewhere else. There was a feeling that they were not sufficiently contributing to the war effort, despite their necessary work in producing crops or permitting others to run committees. At the heart of the book, however, beyond the comedy and fascinating dialogue, is the fear of what is to come, the separation and worse. After all, when Thirkell was writing this novel neither she or anyone else knew what was to come, or how long it would last. A most enjoyable novel, amid the best of Thirkell’s Barsetshire series, and a largely fascinating picture of a society.

 

The illustration above is from the new Virago Modern Classics edition of this book, due to be available in the UK in August of this year. Together With “Peace Breaks Out” and “Growing Up” these paperbacks will be available for the first time in years, as up until now it was a matter of finding a much older edition which could be expensive, or reading them as ebooks. I thought to keep this review until August, but I knew I had ample time to read and review the book now. Despite having some older printed editions, I will hope to buy these new editions – will you?

Happy Returns by Angela Thirkell – a later Barsetshire novel full of favourite characters

Happy Returns by Angela Thirkell

 

A later novel in the Barsetshire series, this 1952 novel is full of what makes Angela Thirkell’s books so readable and safe. Lots of characters who have appeared in the series before, maybe being the principal focus of a particular volume such as the Brandons, remerge in this volume. If the previous novel, “The Duke’s Daughter” dealt with several engagements, with one notable exception in this book these engagements have flowered into marriage, and first babies are expected. By this stage in her writing career Thirkell is confident of her style and subject matter; as in this novel there is a story arc around a small number of characters, and this suffices for a plot. She was brave enough to allow that not every single person automatically lives happily ever after, and it is a mark of her confidence that hopes can be frustrated. Overall, however, this is an enjoyable and uplifting novel of love realised and dreams fulfilled, a story conveyed in sharp, realistic dialogue and settings which are completely comfortable. 

 

One of the central focus in this novel is the family of Lady Lufton, mother of Lord Lufton and two daughters. She is a widow, and her son is always convinced that she is displaying every sign of sorrow. However Mr Macfadyen, tenant of the Lufton family in part of their family house is encouraging her to go out socially, apart from her determined managing of the local WI where she is confident and outgoing. Lord Lufton is less than confident  despite his position, a young man who is aware that even attending the House of Lords in London is expensive. Another young man who is unsure of his ambition is Eric Swan, an old boy of the local boys school, soldier in the recent War, teaching at Philip Winter’s prep. School. He could obtain a fellowship at a favoured college, but there are attractions to staying in Barsetshire which go beyond the friendliness of some local families. 

 

Others put in smaller but significant appearances. Lady Cora is keen to engage a particular Nurse for her expected child, and in her negotiation she has to confront an issue that has been noted by several Barsetshire residents. There is also a new clergy family in a vicarage known to many, a young family without the private income that was still common among many of the local clergy. Having a young family and being devoted to the work of the church has made them struggle financially, so more than one well wisher seeks to intervene. There is one engagement that featured in the previous novel which has not resulted in marriage yet, and it seems that things are not running smoothly as a result. It takes decisive action on the part of more than one person to resolve the situation.

 

This is a mature novel with much to offer a keen reader of Barsetshire novels, and is probably self contained enough to be enjoyed out of order. Being a later book in the series, there are a multitude of characters and plot lines to resolve or continue, which means that this book, like many others in the series, consists mainly of dropping in on many events and meetings. It is an absorbing and thoroughly engaging book like many of the other books in this series, and is a recommended read of tales from Barsetshire.   

 

This is my latest post in my occasional series of reviews of Angela Thirkell’ Barsetshire novels. I tried to review the books that were being republished by

Happy Returns by Angela Thirkell

A later novel in the Barsetshire series, this 1952 novel is full of what makes Angela Thirkell’s books so readable and safe. Lots of characters who have appeared in the series before, maybe being the principal focus of a particular volume such as the Brandons, remerge in this volume. If the previous novel, “The Duke’s Daughter” dealt with several engagements, with one notable exception in this book these engagements have flowered into marriage, and first babies are expected. By this stage in her writing career Thirkell is confident of her style and subject matter; as in this novel there is a story arc around a small number of characters, and this suffices for a plot. She was brave enough to allow that not every single person automatically lives happily ever after, and it is a mark of her confidence that hopes can be frustrated. Overall, however, this is an enjoyable and uplifting novel of love realised and dreams fulfilled, a story conveyed in sharp, realistic dialogue and settings which are completely comfortable.

One of the central focus in this novel is the family of Lady Lufton, mother of Lord Lufton and two daughters. She is a widow, and her son is always convinced that she is displaying every sign of sorrow. However Mr Macfadyen, tenant of the Lufton family in part of their family house is encouraging her to go out socially, apart from her determined managing of the local WI where she is confident and outgoing. Lord Lufton is less than confident despite his position, a young man who is aware that even attending the House of Lords in London is expensive. Another young man who is unsure of his ambition is Eric Swan, an old boy of the local boys school, soldier in the recent War, teaching at Philip Winter’s prep. School. He could obtain a fellowship at a favoured college, but there are attractions to staying in Barsetshire which go beyond the friendliness of some local families.

Others put in smaller but significant appearances. Lady Cora is keen to engage a particular Nurse for her expected child, and in her negotiation she has to confront an issue that has been noted by several Barsetshire residents. There is also a new clergy family in a vicarage known to many, a young family without the private income that was still common among many of the local clergy. Having a young family and being devoted to the work of the church has made them struggle financially, so more than one well wisher seeks to intervene. There is one engagement that featured in the previous novel which has not resulted in marriage yet, and it seems that things are not running smoothly as a result. It takes decisive action on the part of more than one person to resolve the situation.

This is a mature novel with much to offer a keen reader of Barsetshire novels, and is probably self contained enough to be enjoyed out of order. Being a later book in the series, there are a multitude of characters and plot lines to resolve or continue, which means that this book, like many others in the series, consists mainly of dropping in on many events and meetings. It is an absorbing and thoroughly engaging book like many of the other books in this series, and is a recommended read of tales from Barsetshire.

 

This is a my latest post in my occasional series of reviews of Angela Thirkell’s Barsetshire novels. I tried to feature the books that had been republished by Virago in their Modern Classics series, but the new volumes were being brought out over several years so I also reviewed books that were still more difficult to collect. So while you can find all of my reviews so far under “Angela Thirkell” in the column to the right of this post, I am aware that there are gaps.

 

Meanwhile I am combining new books and some older favourites. I am looking forward to reviewing some more Barbara Pym books, as well as making the attempt to posting about Georgette Heyer. I am hoping that anyone interested in reading the actual books I review is still able to get hold of them in one form or another, as I am finding reading a help at the moment. Well, it is easier than helping Northernvicar with the gardening!

 

The Duke’s Daughter by Angela Thirkell – Barsetshire’s Romantic Resolutions for many

The Duke's Daughter by Angela Thirkell

 

Barsetshire is recovering from the War in this 1951 novel in the series which delves into the lives of the gentry and minor aristocracy of a mythical English county. For those familiar with the books of Angela Thirkell, this late volume in the set of books featuring a number of families, friends and complicated connections is a welcome round up to many characters’ stories. However, those who are new to the books or have picked up this particular episode will be able to enjoy it for its own merits. I think that it is particularly strong on certain characters’ narrative; certainly Thirkell takes the opportunity to find and develop certain romances that have featured in past books, if only by hints and suggestions. The Duke’s Daughter of the title is Lady Cora, a naturally beautiful and capable young woman who has had to come to terms with her family’s relative poverty: as with several families in the area staying in the large ancestral home is difficult if not impossible, several individuals realise that theirs is the last generation to live in the large house. Moreover, some adult children are discovering that the single life is no longer enough. 

 

The recent War has left its mark on the area. Clothes, houses and gardens are shabby, petrol is still restricted and food is not plentiful in many homes. Despite this, events like the Archeological meeting still draws in the crowds of people having the same conversations as the previous years with the same people. There is much here about a boys’ school run by Phillip and Leslie, the latter being a war widow who has married the Headmaster. Cora herself has had sad losses; a brother and male friends who were possibly very special to her. There is Tom Grantly, whose war was testing and who has found difficulty in settling after returning from University, his time working with Martin and Emmy on one of the estates was abandoned as he moved onto a government job. His hatred of Geoffrey Harvey who is generally unpopular means that Tom is having a hard time, and is struggling with other aspects of his life. Cecil Waring has returned from War to his inheritance of a large house and much else. Clarissa is still missing her beloved grandmother Lady Emily, and is going through a difficult stage. Oliver Marling still admires Jessica Dean, and it is in this book that he discovers there may be other possibilities.

 

Anthony Trollope readers will notice names from his Barsetshire books of the families which still pop up in these books. This is a wonderful collection of people and their stories as they move together and apart, discover new things about each other and their homes, choose their jobs and occupations, cope with the daily challenges of lives on the land and in some of the schools and businesses. There are children and babies, new generations to discover. I really enjoyed this book, if only because towards the end there is an accounting for many characters. Some issues are resolved after several books, while there are references to characters who do not appear in this volume who have been important before or will be again. I think this book is a good accounting of the fates of many, while cleverly leaving other strands and characters still to be dealt with in later books. I believe this book can be read out of order and still enjoyed, but also works well as places and people are referred to that will please those who have encountered the other books, as even quite minor characters get their moments. It may be a more difficult to obtain book, but would repay the effort handsomely if copies can be tracked down.   

 

The above review is the latest in a series of reviews of Angela Thirkell’s Barsetshire novels. I still have about ten to review I believe, so it will keep me going for a while! If you wish to seethe others, just tap on Thirkell’s name in the Categories column. I am still aiming for a review a day over the foreseeable future, though there will be some very different books from the above, I hope to suggest some lighter reads (or at least newer books).

Miss Bunting by Angela Thirkell – A wartime book of gentle village life with a dash of humour

Image result for Miss Bunting thirkell

 

An aged governess brings together several of the noted families of Barsetshire in this gentle novel of the imaginary county as one of the wartime editions of this wonderful series. As with virtually all of her other novels, this is more than a standalone book, as it is independent in its storyline, but makes reference to characters who have featured or will feature in the Barsetshire stories. Although published originally in 1945, this book is one of a series reprinted in the Virago Modern Classics series, which makes it easily available. 

 

 Despite its original time of writing, this is far from a tale of wartime horrors, blitz or even severe shortages. Rather, its gentle humour deals with the problems of class, of acceptable behaviour and taste, and the difficulties of at least one character who has sustained a life changing injury. The most serious ongoing theme throughout is the plight of Jane Gresham, whose naval officer husband is missing in action. Torn by her fears for him in a strange land, her attempts to rationalise her feelings and her need to deal with her young son Frank, she is a resolute yet troubled woman who seeks to maintain her life. Only Thirkell could create and sustain a small boy like Frank Gresham and his friend Tom Watson; fans of the Barsetshire series will recall Tony Morland, who also alternately reduced his mother to fury and despairing affection by his continual talking and wild plans. Frank is a toned down version, but still has the hall marks of the original model. 

 

The Miss Bunting of the title is an elderly governess who has taught in many of the notable families described in the novels. In this book she has been engaged by Sir Robert and Lady Fielding to act as teacher and companion to their daughter Anne who has previously struggled with school. Living in the village brings the shy girl into contact with different people, including Robin Dale, son of the elderly vicar and teacher of Frank and Tom. Less acceptably to her parents she meets Heather and her father Sam Adams. Mr Adams has made his considerable fortune in engineering and has few social skills by Barsetshire standards, and his daughter has not grown up with the understanding of the middle and upper classes that would prepare her for life in the village. As small events and various incidents occur throughout the novel, the humour of daily life amid shortages and war are fascinating.

 

This book’s themes are somewhat dated and would be controversial if examined too closely. Class and social expectations mean than some people and their actions are universally condemned, while there is a lot of criticism of a servant who is in some respects a refugee from the fighting in Europe. This is a book which shows its age. However, It is essentially a good natured book, a gentle book, and a book which deals with its characters in a realistic way. It has rhythms and themes common to Thirkell at her best, and is incredibly sensitive to the plight of Jane Gresham and eventually, Miss Bunting herself. Overall I am very fond of this book, admiring its characters and their interactions. In the scale of Thirkells series of novels it is a favourite for its gentle appreciation of people in their places and the situations in which they find themselves. Its humour and real affection for singular people shines through the writing, and I thoroughly recommend it to all. 

 

This is another review in my occasional series of looking at Angela Thirkell’s books, in which I have picked an unusual path through the Barsetshire tales. I hope they are of interest to both those who know and love the books already, as well as a form of introduction to those who are less familiar with the social world that she created.

 

County Chronicles by Angela Thirkell – A later Barsetshire novel of love, change and postwar life

Image result for County Chronicle Thirkell

 

It is the late forties, and Thirkell carries on the story of Barsetshire through her usual themes: families, friends, allies and mild enemies. It is rooted in the countryside, the houses, cottages and great buildings of the town and county. The memories of at least one war runs through conversations and thoughts as people consider the thankfully few losses of loved ones. Families are nonetheless changed, as traditions are upset and houses are no longer remain in the same ownership. New relationships can now be considered as some of the old rules are relaxed. An individual’s wealth is now important as well as their family, and some interesting relationships are created, not least between the new man of money, Sam Adams, and Lucy Marling from an old established but impoverished family. As the local church hierarchy is mentioned, the Bishop’s Palace is gently upset by the restoration of a bell allegedly used by fish asking for food by some mischievous children. This novel, in common with all of the other Barsetshire books, has a gentle reminder of the Barchester novels of Anthony Trollope, and the character names of his more famous families. Though not one of my favourite wartime novels, this book succeeds in carrying the story forward into a brave new postwar world, even though it is not universally welcomed. 

 

This is a book where many stories and themes move throughout. Apart from the younger Lucy who discovers love and purpose through her marriage to Mr Adams, there is the mysterious Isabel whose sense of duty to her ailing mother means that even her dependability as a secretary and help must be second in her priorities.  Political issues and the near universally deplored Labour government are seen as the reason for reduction in income, but finance is needed to stand as a Member of Parliament, which the older established families do not have. Sorrow is expressed at the departure of the local Vicar, as his replacement will have a different attitude to the local families. Inheritance is still an issue, with depleted lands and daughters of even wealthy households determined to work amidst the farm animals. 

 

Lady Agnes is still vague and concerned with clothes and seemingly unaware of reality, but is always saved by her undoubted affectionate generosity. Those who were children in previous volumes are now grown up and causing their own waves in the traditional community, even if the weak and lovelorn Oliver Marling is still upsetting people. Another young man who is being condemned by many is Francis Brandon whose continued presence in his mother’s home together with his wife and children is seen as a deplorable situation. Lady Cora is a duke’s daughter with a sad past of lost loves in the recent war, but with a lot of drive in every respect. Her independence and determination to keep her family home going seems an old fashioned sort of quest, but the reader is left in no doubt that if anyone can save the farm and ancestral home it will be her. That she feels that there is no chance of finding love for herself is a sad note in a book that is full of romances at many ages. 

 

This later book is sometimes confusing because of similar names such as Belton and Brandon, children and young people whose ages are not always consistent with what has occurred in previous novels, and place names which are not always clear. Thirkell herself admitted that she struggled with consistency in her later books, and it is only relatively recently that her devotees have tried to sort out maps and other questions.  This is an excellent book, as comforting as any of her earlier writing, and I recommend it as a lovely read to anyone who enjoys complicated family and community stories.  

 

It is a while since I have posted a review of Angela Thirkell’s books, but I am still trying to cover all of her Barsetshire novels. If you wish to find my earlier posts, just look under her name above on the right. I have lost count how many there are! I am trying to fill in the gaps.     

The Old Bank House by Angela Thirkell – A Wallow in the Perpetual Summer of 1949

Image result for old bank house thirkell

This postwar Thirkell novel, as ever featuring the inhabitants of Barsetshire, revels in its interconnectedness. Though it could be read as a standalone, mainly concerning the Grantly family, a vicarage family shown in that difficult period immediately after the Second World War, the surrounding characters and the character of the eponymous House are so interconnected with the previous seventeen novels that it will be better appreciated as part of that long series. Grantlys, Marlings, Leslies, and Adams to name but a few families all have their contribution to make in this 1949 novel. While not the most easy to acquire book by Angela Thirkell, this is a novel of country life and people that will be enjoyed by long standing fans of the series, and provide gentle treats for the newer reader.

The story opens in Edgewood Rectory, set in its ancient landscape, but with a family of the time. Mrs Grantly has some vague notions, but loves her brood of four children who have all grown up with the challenges presented by war. Tom, a major in the Army who has returned to Oxford at his demobilisation, is feeling the confusion of a soon to be older graduate about what he can do with his considerable life experience. Eleanor has found a job well known to readers of Barsetshire, in the Red Cross library, but yearns to find a different employment with a family who will come to seem fond of her. Henry is annoyingly and ceaselessly looking for his call up papers for the peacetime army. Grace is at the annoying stage, literally latching onto various individuals. The Rector, Mr Grantly, is bewildered by his family, but accompanies his wife to see the elderly Miss Sowerby who is regretfully leaving the Old Bank House, an ancient and sympathetically described dwelling which has been bought by the blustering but good hearted Mr Adams. Much comedy ensues around a rare plant, taken care of by a boy in the kitchen away from those who would seek its seeds. This is a book in which romance is found, a gentle departure occurs, and some confusion over resulting employment all contributes to a satisfying end. There is the usual element of kindly farce as misunderstandings and personalities combine to work out in the end. With some splendid set pieces concerning a handsome bull, a well, and some interesting children, this is a delightful book dealing with characters who have become like friends to the long term reader.

While this is not one of the most significant books in the Barsetshire series, it does resolve the difficulties of several characters, even if the ages and generations involved are beginning to get a little hazy. This book represents the post war rationing, and the decline of some of the families who once lived in the large houses they now inhabit part of while still having many civic duties. There are still the class concerns of servants who are unmarried yet mother to several, there are still days in which the Nurses bring up children in nurseries. A man who owns factories and successful businesses can still struggle with social conventions, while a matriarch wonders aloud how to say thank you to American friends who still send food parcels.  This is a book for those who know something of Barsetshire, but also those who are beginning to discover its joys. If you are able to locate this gentle, humourous book, I recommend it as a good read, wallowing in its perpetual summer.

 

As the clocks go back, I believe I managed to squeeze an extra hour of reading in, which was fortunate as  have a lot of books to finish and posts to write. Last night was a Variety concert in the church Hall – I read an extract from “Bed Among the Lentils”, one of Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads monologues. This one features a Vicar’s Wife with alcohol problems….It all went very well, and there was some lovely music played. Meanwhile the temperature has definitely dropped here, and it is dark. More than time to read many books!

Love among the Ruins by Angela Thirkell; Barsetshire with all its characters in full detail.

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This 1948 novel is a late, and relatively difficult to get hold of, entry into the Barsetshire series. Covering a reasonably large number of characters introduced in previous novels, it is perhaps not the place to start with Thirkell’s books, but would work out of sequence, which is the way I have read it first time round. Having read the vast majority of Thirkell’s books at least once, I recognised most of the characters, even if they did cause me some confusion at times. Fortunately, even if the names are sometimes a little too similar, (Lucy and Lydia, Brandons and Beltons) Thirkell was such an able and experienced writer that she makes her characters real individuals, with quirks both attractive and difficult. That is one of the most fascinating skills that Thirkell had, and she exploited to the full even in her less popular books; her characters are annoying, exasperating, and sometimes tiresome. They are not always young, beautiful and attractive; they are perhaps older, negative about many things, and tough to like. They are always memorable, different from each other, though some may share some characteristics (Mr. Middleton’s monologues compared with George Knox’s, anyone?).

This book shows those who have survived the problems of the Second World War, mainly on the Home Front, in various situations. Some lives have changed forever, whereas others have largely continued in a similar way, though perhaps with sad losses. A school has been established in one of the big houses, and the usual complicated links between the staff, parents and the general naughtiness of the children is fully described. The great sadness of Freddy Belton seems to be hampering his relationships with other women; his mother watches on with sadness as more than one women, or girl, is showing an interest. Lady Graham is an older woman still gathering attention from impressionable young men, even if Richard Tebben is more interested in a new love. Jessica Dean is still artistically ensnaring one and all, but her sister Susan is discovering that a new love is disturbingly powerful.  A less important character, Mrs Updike, is still having minor accidents, while the servants and gardeners often know exactly what is going on and wield the real power. The distinction between children and adolescents is a grey one; while Clarissa tries to be mature, the Leslie boys are still climbing buildings. At least two aristocratic men are being saved from undue pressure by their noble and able wives, while Miss Merriman hides her secret feelings under the pressures of looking after lovely Lady Emily and her portable property, especially at her birthday celebrations. Will this book, as so many of the Barsetshire novels, end with an engagement, or will there merely be stirrings of affection between those who have given upon marriage?

There is therefore much for Thirkell fans to enjoy in this novel, as people carry on being themselves under a warm sun, friendships changed by war remerge, and even the lively David Leslie seems tamed by marriage and fatherhood. Many of the favourite characters are present; while there is no great drama this is still a comforting slice of mainly rural life of immediate postwar Britain. Class and politics are still discussed, but only as it affects life and supplies. There are passing references to the standard foreign characters, and there is still a servant class, perhaps including the huge family of Ed the mechanic. This may be upsetting to some, but it is probably an authentic view of how certain people reacted to the daily difficulties of life. As always, I greatly enjoyed this somewhat longer book, and recommend it if you can get sight of a copy.

I am actually fortunate enough to have two copies of this book, one a first edition found at the Astley Book Barn. I have discovered that the most unlikely places sometimes hide wonderful books, but they need some tracking down (and to be resistant to dust and cobwebs). I’m still fighting with that big university essay, but I have some wonderful books to read so it is a tough life. Meanwhile, the tortoises are home but the kittens are coming….Here is hoping that Selwyn the Vicarage cat will not attempt to lead an escape attempt again!